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INTRODUCING AND DEFINING AN AUP TO STAFF
 
 


This set of activities can be used with managers, staff, volunteers and/or users - and preferably with groups made up of representatives from all of these. You may wish to adapt this to suit your circumstances. (Times are given as a guide but will vary between groups).

1. Introduce this activity
An example introduction is given here: This activity is intended to stimulate debate about our acceptable use policy. There will be a chance for everyone to have a say and all views will carry equal weight at this stage of the process. The results of this session will then be passed on to a small working group who will turn our ideas into a formal policy. It will be the responsibility of that group to ensure that the policy does protect the reputation of the centre and ensure that we comply with the law.
(5 minutes)

2. Separate participants into mixed groups of 6-10 people
Give each group a pack of activity cards and ask them to create and agree three piles:-
•  Acceptable activities in our organization
•  Unacceptable activities in our organization
•  Activities which we want to consider further before making a decision
(35 minutes)

3. Groups select a representative to present their decision to the next group

4. Whole group plenary session. Aggregated findings are collated and whole group discussion focuses on activities where agreement has not been reached.

5. Agree membership of the follow-up working group with time scale and reporting back arrangements to all centre users.

Category headings:
•  Unacceptable activities in our centre (red background)
•  Activities which we want to consider further before making a decision (amber background)
•  Acceptable activities in our centre (green background)

Items to discuss:
•  Participating in formal learning programmes run by the organization
•  Participating in on-line learning programmes provided by another organization
•  Undertaking homework or assignments for a course run by another organization
•  Use of word processors to write CV's and job applications
•  Use of word processors to write personal letters
•  Use of spreadsheets for personal financial planning
•  Use of database for personal contacts
•  Preparing Powerpoint presentations for use at work
•  Using a DTP package to produce a community newsletter
•  Using a DTP package to prepare private birthday invitations
•  Use of email to send personal messages
•  Use of email to send large numbers of commercial advertising messages (SPAM)
•  Use of the internet to research topics associated with formal study
•  Use of the internet to access government services on line
•  Use of the internet to research topics of personal interest (not linked to formal study)
•  Use of the internet to access the web sites of mainstream political parties
•  Use of the internet to access web sites associated with religious groups
•  Use of the internet to access web sites which incite racial hatred
•  Use of the internet to access web sites which give advice on how to undertake terrorist acts
•  Use of the internet to access web sites showing pornography
•  Use of the internet to access games which feature violence
•  Use of the internet to access online games
•  Use of the internet to access web sites which display degrading images of women
•  Use of the internet to access web sites which mock people with certain physical or mental
    characteristics
•  Creation and maintenance of personal web sites
•  Creation and maintenance of web sites for local community organizations
•  Creation and maintenance of web sites for local political organizations
•  Use of the internet for personal online banking
•  Use of the internet to make online purchases
•  Use of the internet to run a small business
•  Use of the internet to publish material copyrighted to someone else
•  Access to online text-based chat
•  Use of the internet for "Voice Chat"
•  Downloading music files at no cost from the internet
•  Altering default settings on software
•  Downloading new software to centre computers
•  Bringing in personal floppy disks which have been used in computers outside the organization